maritime property

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Mobilisations during the October 17 Uprising to reclaim seafront public properties

Over the past decades, environmental issues and access to natural resources stood out as major components of the broader landscape of social mobilisation in Lebanon. Despite oppressive practices and the hegemony’s attempts to …

Count of Public State Property Reclassification Decrees (per district and timeframe)

The state’s “public” property — legally known as “reserved protected land” includes any property meant to be used in the public interest, such as riverbeds, riverbanks, sea shores, waterfalls, lakes, irrigation canals, roads, …

The Reclassification of Public State Property, a Tool to Fulfill the Desires of the Powerful

ينتشر اليوم خطاب واسع ويطغى، مسوّقاً لخصخَصة الأملاك العامة كوسيلةٍ لإنقاذ الدولة من الإفلاس. هذه الأملاك هي جزء أساسي من محفظة أصول لبنان العامة…

Mapping State-Owned Land Against Privatization

In light of the ongoing financial and economic collapse, mainstream public discourse called for the privatization of public assets, to save the state from bankruptcy, through a fund enabling banks to seize state-owned …

Mapping State-Owned Land Against Privatization

In light of the ongoing financial and economic collapse, mainstream public discourse called for the privatization of public assets, to save the state from bankruptcy, through a fund enabling banks to seize state-owned …

Mapping State-Owned Land Against Privatization

In Lebanon, the state owns a substantial part of the territory, estimated to range between 20 and 25 per cent of the country’s total surface area. These publicly owned properties – the unbuilt ones – constitute our natural and ecological environment. They are a national asset directly linked to our ways of life and diverse livelihoods across Lebanese regions. Yet these public properties are the newest target of privatization through multiple government plans.
In this series of articles, part of an in-depth research project, we try to answer the following questions: What kind of land is owned by the Lebanese state? Where is it located? What social value does it hold? And what do we stand to lose if the state concedes this land?In this series of articles, part of an in-depth research project, we try to answer the following questions: What kind of land is owned by the Lebanese state? Where is it located? What social value does it hold? And what do we stand to lose if the state concedes this land?

Discussion in Jal El Dib’s Public Square

Waterfront Investment in the Service of the Rentier Economy

The development and organization of the Lebanese coast has often been associated with the construction and real estate industry. In the northern part of El Meten district, projects such as LINORD and Waterfront …

A Chapter on the City in “The Legal Agenda” Magazine

As part of our efforts to promote spatial justice, the right to the city, and urban policies, Public Works Studio published a section in the “Legal Agenda” magazine, aiming to enhance knowledge and …

Practicing the Public

This collection of essays and maps digs beyond the apparent dichotomies between public and private spaces in an effort to understand what makes public space such a complex minefield. The publication starts with …

Exhibition at Sursock Museum: Recreational sites in 1950s Beirut

English translation in progress.

Recreational Sites in 1950s Beirut

Next to the “official” history of Beirut that recounts its spatial production through the establishment of formal urban squares and gardens (such as Place de L’Etoile, Sanayeh Garden, Place des Canons), we drew …